Highlight of the Day

Much to my surprise when I looked out the window of our apartment what did I see but a COYOTE. He was just sitting among the shrubs near the main building. I had never seen a coyote before. I had heard of other sightings in Ballard and further out in the country. But there was one right before my eyes right here in Shoreline, just a few miles north of Ballard. As I gazed in amazement he casually got up and walked slowly away. I was so excited!

But sorry – no photo. – the coyote was gone before I even thought of getting my camera.

Lost

I’ve been slow on blogging recently because I’ve been looking for a particular item to introduce a new series of blog entries. I’ve been searching the innards of this computer. The computer has this account/story hidden somewhere – somewhere in Ancestry stories. I’m sure I didn’t imagine it. I read it here but unfortunately didn’t make a note of it or flag it or whatever so that I could find it again. So I’ve been searching for it for about a week and of course been flailing about in all sorts of directions. It is a very good account of what life was like on the journey to America back in the early 1600’s. So many of my ancestors made this journey in the first half of the 17th century, particularly from 1620 – 1650., from England to New England. I wanted to use this account to introduce a series of profiles of these particular ancestors.

My neat workspace

The Abandoned Daughter by Mary Wood – a powerful tale of loves as the First World War ends

Northern Reader

This is a powerful book with memorable characters in every sense.

A young woman who was an abandoned child with no knowledge of her birth family is the main character of  this second book in the Girls Who Went to War series. It stands alone as a vivid story of the ending of the First World War, and how the myth of a land fit for heroes in many ways proved to be false. The situations that Ella finds herself in, the risks she takes and the love she experiences make for an enormous saga of people and place, a frequently moving story of the fight for survival, and a complex tale of love and loss. With near breathtaking confidence and a sure way with plot and dialogue, this is one woman’s powerful story of a dramatic life that literally kept me awake, so keen was I to find out…

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Choosing The Next Book…….

Do you read a book you really like- do you just sit down and read it nonstop? That is what I have been doing recently. Just enjoying my book reading so much – and hardly waiting to choose and start the next one. This afternoon I plowed along and finished reading Janet At Noon by Jane Duncan aka Janet Sandison. This is the 2nd book of 4. jean in the Morning was the first book in the series of 4. It was published in 1971. I read many of Jane Duncan’s books years ago. She wrote a whole series of “My Friends …..” books. Straight forward and charming. This series I’m reading now is a recent discovery which I obtained from a bookseller in Florida. The copies are each well worn ex-library books. What a find!!

But now I am faced with the joy of choosing my next book. I’ll give Jane Duncan a rest before reading Janet in the Evening, the3rd book of 4. Will I read a John Le Carre or maybe Marley, a take on the Dickens character?

One Woman’s Year by Stella Martin Currey – a Persephone book of a year in the 1950s

Northern Reader

One Woman's Year by Stella Martin CurreyOne Woman's Year by Stella Martin Currey – Persephone Books

This 1953 book, beautifully republished by Persephone, is a sort of household book of the year, as a section is devoted to each month. Not that it is a book of out of date household advice, though it does offer recipes and other notes of monthly tasks, it is a sort of observation of the changing seasons. It takes a light view of the most liked and disliked jobs of the month, ranging from the much liked “Reading Forgotten Books During Spring Cleaning” to the disliked “Looking Your Passport in the Face”. There is a quote from the “British Merlin” of 1677 for every month, in which characteristically dated language explores what plants and crops to plant, particular “Physick” concerns, and foods to avoid. A sharp sense of humour pervades every piece, especially the longer observation of an element of life which is written up in full. This is a…

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Color Combinations

Dame Edith Sitwell 1916 Alvaro Guevara 1894-1951 Presented by Lord Duveen, Walter Taylor and George Eumorfopoulos through the Art Fund 1920 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N03509

I am not sure where I found this portrait of the English poet Dame Edith Sitwell, but it is certainly very striking. Just the combination of colors! Maybe I was meant to find it for that reason. I am knitting a series of scarves now and am experimenting with different color combinations.

I like the image below for the strength of the red color.

And the image below for the more muted blend of the colors.

Il Cognome Franch In Cloz

Genealogy is engrossing.

allenrizzi

Di questo cognome ci è pervenuta una ricerca completa da parte di Allen Rizzi, un Americano originario di Cloz, attulmente residente a Tret.

Franch è lo cognome più comune in Cloz e anche un di più antico di Cloz. Il cognome Franch originalmente descrisse una persona libero delle tasse. Ma, perche? Ricerca recente ha trovato che i Franch eranno originalmente delle classe nobile sotto Charlemagne, Re di Franks (742-814) durante la sua conquista di questa regione di anno 773. Il cognome sviluppò come un sopranome per descrivere un gruppo di famiglie che non doverono pagare tasse sotto l’imperatore. Eranno libre delle tasse per la volanta del Charlemagne. Perciò, noi possiamo presumere che le persone chiamarono Franch sia originalmente di Lombardia e una parte della corte di Charlemagne. Le altre teorie suggeriscono che Franch è un nome ebreo portato a questa regione dei schiavi ebrei di Roma. Comunque, questa teoria non…

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